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ARMAN The last Violin Bronze sculpture 20th Century Signed numbered Modern Art
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  • ARMAN The last Violin Bronze sculpture 20th Century Signed numbered Modern Art

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    ARMAN ( 1928 / 2005 )
    The last Violin, 1977.
    Wooden violin soundboard case, included in polyester resin and nested in a plexiglass frame, signed and numbered 176 / 200 under the base.
    Height: 41 cm
    Width: 25 cm
    Depth : 5 cm
    This work is registered in the Archives of the ARMAN Foundation under the number: ARM 946.
    ARMAN, born Armand Fernandez on November 17, 1928 in Nice and died in New York on October 22, 2005, is a Franco-American artist, painter, sculptor and visual artist, renowned for his "accumulations". He was one of the first to directly use, as pictorial material, manufactured objects, which for him represented the multiple and infinite extensions of the human hand that undergo a continuous cycle of production, consumption, destruction.The only son of Antonio Fernandez, a furniture and antiques dealer, of Spanish origin who lived in Algeria, and Marguerite Jacquet, from a family of farmers in the Loire, the young Armand showed very early disposition for drawing and painting. After his bachelor's degree, he studied at the École des arts décoratifs in Nice (now the villa Arson), then at the École du Louvre. He met Yves Klein and Claude Pascal at the judo school they attended in Nice in 1947. With these two friends, he became interested for a time in Eastern philosophies and Rosicrucian theory.At the end of 1957, Arman, who signed his works with his first name in tribute to Van Gogh, decided to abandon Armand's "d" and formalized his signature as an artist, in 1958, on the occasion of an exhibition at Iris Clert.In October 1960, he made the exhibition "Le Plein" where he filled Iris Clert's gallery with discarded objects and the contents of selected trash cans. This exhibition is the counterpoint to the exhibition "Le Vide" organized two years earlier at the same gallery by his friend Yves Klein.Also in the same month, under the leadership of the art critic Pierre Restany, Arman became, with Yves Klein, one of the founding members of the group of New Realists (proclaimed by Restany: "new perceptive approaches to reality"), alongside François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Martial Raysse, Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely and Jacques Villeglé, later joined by César, Mimmo Rotella, Niki de Saint Phalle, Gerard Deschamps and in 1963 Christo.From 1961, Arman developed his career in New York, where he lived and worked half his time, alternating with his life in Nice until 1967, then in Vence until his death. In New York, he stayed first at the Chelsea Hotel until 1970, then in a loft in the SoHo district and, from 1985, in his apartment building in TriBeCa, where he died in 2005.After his death in New York, some of his ashes were brought back to Paris in 2008 to be buried at the Père Lachaise Cimetiere1.All his life, Arman was also a passionate collector of everyday objects (watches, weapons, pens ...) and art objects, in particular traditional African art of which he was a connoisseur, appreciated and recognized specialist.Arman had dual citizenship, French and American, acquired in 1972.The workeArman was interested in the status of the object and the relationship that modern societies have with it, between sacralization and overconsumption-destruction.In 1955, the Galerie du Haut-Pavé organized his first solo exhibition in Paris.His first "Cachets" (traces of inked or painted objects) in Paris date from 1956.In 1959, he began the realization of the series of "Garbage Cans": he exhibited household garbage, detritus found on the street and garbage. His "accumulations" of objects following a quantitative logic that erases their singularity reflect an image of profusion, at the same time as they emphasize the perishable character of the products of the society of abundance.In 1960, he used plexiglass for the first time.In 1961, he began the series of "Angères": destruction of objects (the "Cups" of violin, piano, double bass ...) expertly glued on pedestals or on wall supports. In the "Combustions" (1963), these same objects are burned.Between 1980 and 1999, the range of works and techniques expanded. Arman declines and multiplies the various enforcement procedures. At the end of the 1990s, the work became radicalized into a succession of gestures related to the object (Accumulations in Relation, Cascades, Combo Sandwiches). He shows a renewed interest in painting (The Starry Night, Nec Mergitur).A major retrospective took place at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume from January to April 1998, an exhibition that brought together more than a hundred works (from 1959 to 1997). The retrospective then traveled until 2001 to Germany, Portugal, Israel, Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan, Spain ... In 2000, he worked on fragmentations on panel, fragments (drawings and sculptures). He presents a thematic retrospective ("The Crossing of Objects"), at the Château de Villeneuve, in Vence (France).His bronze sculptures participate in a similar gesture: the artist seizes the icons of Western art (Venus de Milo, Hercules Farnese, etc.), which he cuts off and then resolders them in a searched mess.In 2002-2003, Arman returned to easel painting in a series of works, "Serious Paintings", which combine the recomposition of musical instruments with their "staging" in painting.

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    ARMAN ( 1928 / 2005 )
    The last Violin, 1977.
    Wooden violin soundboard case, included in polyester resin and nested in a plexiglass frame, signed and numbered 176 / 200 under the base.
    Height: 41 cm
    Width: 25 cm
    Depth : 5 cm
    This work is registered in the Archives of the ARMAN Foundation under the number: ARM 946.
    ARMAN, born Armand Fernandez on November 17, 1928 in Nice and died in New York on October 22, 2005, is a Franco-American artist, painter, sculptor and visual artist, renowned for his "accumulations". He was one of the first to directly use, as pictorial material, manufactured objects, which for him represented the multiple and infinite extensions of the human hand that undergo a continuous cycle of production, consumption, destruction.The only son of Antonio Fernandez, a furniture and antiques dealer, of Spanish origin who lived in Algeria, and Marguerite Jacquet, from a family of farmers in the Loire, the young Armand showed very early disposition for drawing and painting. After his bachelor's degree, he studied at the École des arts décoratifs in Nice (now the villa Arson), then at the École du Louvre. He met Yves Klein and Claude Pascal at the judo school they attended in Nice in 1947. With these two friends, he became interested for a time in Eastern philosophies and Rosicrucian theory.At the end of 1957, Arman, who signed his works with his first name in tribute to Van Gogh, decided to abandon Armand's "d" and formalized his signature as an artist, in 1958, on the occasion of an exhibition at Iris Clert.In October 1960, he made the exhibition "Le Plein" where he filled Iris Clert's gallery with discarded objects and the contents of selected trash cans. This exhibition is the counterpoint to the exhibition "Le Vide" organized two years earlier at the same gallery by his friend Yves Klein.Also in the same month, under the leadership of the art critic Pierre Restany, Arman became, with Yves Klein, one of the founding members of the group of New Realists (proclaimed by Restany: "new perceptive approaches to reality"), alongside François Dufrêne, Raymond Hains, Martial Raysse, Daniel Spoerri, Jean Tinguely and Jacques Villeglé, later joined by César, Mimmo Rotella, Niki de Saint Phalle, Gerard Deschamps and in 1963 Christo.From 1961, Arman developed his career in New York, where he lived and worked half his time, alternating with his life in Nice until 1967, then in Vence until his death. In New York, he stayed first at the Chelsea Hotel until 1970, then in a loft in the SoHo district and, from 1985, in his apartment building in TriBeCa, where he died in 2005.After his death in New York, some of his ashes were brought back to Paris in 2008 to be buried at the Père Lachaise Cimetiere1.All his life, Arman was also a passionate collector of everyday objects (watches, weapons, pens ...) and art objects, in particular traditional African art of which he was a connoisseur, appreciated and recognized specialist.Arman had dual citizenship, French and American, acquired in 1972.The workeArman was interested in the status of the object and the relationship that modern societies have with it, between sacralization and overconsumption-destruction.In 1955, the Galerie du Haut-Pavé organized his first solo exhibition in Paris.His first "Cachets" (traces of inked or painted objects) in Paris date from 1956.In 1959, he began the realization of the series of "Garbage Cans": he exhibited household garbage, detritus found on the street and garbage. His "accumulations" of objects following a quantitative logic that erases their singularity reflect an image of profusion, at the same time as they emphasize the perishable character of the products of the society of abundance.In 1960, he used plexiglass for the first time.In 1961, he began the series of "Angères": destruction of objects (the "Cups" of violin, piano, double bass ...) expertly glued on pedestals or on wall supports. In the "Combustions" (1963), these same objects are burned.Between 1980 and 1999, the range of works and techniques expanded. Arman declines and multiplies the various enforcement procedures. At the end of the 1990s, the work became radicalized into a succession of gestures related to the object (Accumulations in Relation, Cascades, Combo Sandwiches). He shows a renewed interest in painting (The Starry Night, Nec Mergitur).A major retrospective took place at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume from January to April 1998, an exhibition that brought together more than a hundred works (from 1959 to 1997). The retrospective then traveled until 2001 to Germany, Portugal, Israel, Brazil, Mexico, Taiwan, Spain ... In 2000, he worked on fragmentations on panel, fragments (drawings and sculptures). He presents a thematic retrospective ("The Crossing of Objects"), at the Château de Villeneuve, in Vence (France).His bronze sculptures participate in a similar gesture: the artist seizes the icons of Western art (Venus de Milo, Hercules Farnese, etc.), which he cuts off and then resolders them in a searched mess.In 2002-2003, Arman returned to easel painting in a series of works, "Serious Paintings", which combine the recomposition of musical instruments with their "staging" in painting.

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